From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

The chart here is simpler than those previously explored, appeared in a japanese publication, was suggested for use in MK as hand technique The lace transfers are in pairs, alternating in direction; this excel chart assigns symbols and colors to them. The repeat is 8 stitches wide, 10 rows tall, which make it suitable for … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

Continuing with the “relatives” of the proposed border chart in the previous post, this gets us even closet to the hand knit. So, I have a punchcard, a 12 stitch repeat, really want to go 14 wide for the repeat, and now several other issues are encountered. If  one thinks about lettering and controlling horizontal direction … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

In machine knitting, frequent color changes are more conveniently made with a color changer. On the Brother KM the latter is placed on the left side of the machine, so the knit carriage will be knitting by default an even number of rows moving from left to right and back to the left. In turn, … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

A forum post inquired on adapting the following border repeat for use on a punchcard Brother KM, using the lace carriage: the repeat is 14 stitches wide as was given below Because of repeat restriction in punchcard knitting, the best way to match the above chart is through the use of hand techniques. The image … Continue reading Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

I have posted previously on lace punchcards, their use, and traveling between machine models. There is extensive documentation in manuals and literature on the mechanics of their patterning. This series will attempt to follow my most recent post, and to visually address the transitions from a charted repeat to a corresponding punchcard. The illustrations may … Continue reading From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

Charting shapes for short row knitting and programming

In machine knitting, stitches are usually brought into hold opposite the carriage. If multiple stitches are brought out to hold on the carriage side, floats are created. Triangles stacked vertically as seen in the previous post, will create a spiral curve along the line where stitches are held. The carriage needs to get to the opposite side … Continue reading Charting shapes for short row knitting and programming

Brother KMs: punchcards and their use

I have recently become involved in a year long project at UMass Lowell, will share details as they develop. Most of my blog posts are written for those who already have a basic knowledge of techniques. Since I may soon be involved in teaching basics to non knitters, I am in the process of getting … Continue reading Brother KMs: punchcards and their use

Geometric shapes in drop stitch lace 3, end release

I began to think about color separations again, in reference to pile knitting, and returned to the chart used in the circular shape in the #1 blog post in this thread. While studying it, it occurred to me that the fabric might be created by releasing the stitches at the end of the knitting. Brother  punchcard … Continue reading Geometric shapes in drop stitch lace 3, end release

Geometric shapes in drop stitch lace 2, Brother KM

Occasionally I do play with hand knitting and charting for it. A couple of years ago I wrote on the topic of  illusion / shadow knitting. The repeat is 24 stitches wide, so it is suitable for use on punchcard machines as well. a chart from that blog post the resulting hand knit, on purl side While working … Continue reading Geometric shapes in drop stitch lace 2, Brother KM