From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

The chart here is simpler than those previously explored, appeared in a japanese publication, was suggested for use in MK as hand technique The lace transfers are in pairs, alternating in direction; this excel chart assigns symbols and colors to them. The repeat is 8 stitches wide, 10 rows tall, which make it suitable for … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

Continuing with the “relatives” of the proposed border chart in the previous post, this gets us even closet to the hand knit. So, I have a punchcard, a 12 stitch repeat, really want to go 14 wide for the repeat, and now several other issues are encountered. If  one thinks about lettering and controlling horizontal direction … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

In machine knitting, frequent color changes are more conveniently made with a color changer. On the Brother KM the latter is placed on the left side of the machine, so the knit carriage will be knitting by default an even number of rows moving from left to right and back to the left. In turn, … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

A forum post inquired on adapting the following border repeat for use on a punchcard Brother KM, using the lace carriage: the repeat is 14 stitches wide as was given below Because of repeat restriction in punchcard knitting, the best way to match the above chart is through the use of hand techniques. The image … Continue reading Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

I have posted previously on lace punchcards, their use, and traveling between machine models. There is extensive documentation in manuals and literature on the mechanics of their patterning. This series will attempt to follow my most recent post, and to visually address the transitions from a charted repeat to a corresponding punchcard. The illustrations may … Continue reading From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

A complex published transfer lace to electronic repeat for download/ GIMP editing

Lace on the machine can render beautiful fabrics that closely resemble hand knitting, but programming very long repeats is a challenge both in placing every hole in the correct square in a punchcard, and in programming individual pixels on a mylar or as pixels for download correctly. I found the “leaf lace” repeat below shared … Continue reading A complex published transfer lace to electronic repeat for download/ GIMP editing

Charting knits using Mac Numbers: color separations 2

This is not intended as a full tutorial, it presumes there is some familiarity with concepts for charting knits or proportioned graph paper using spreadsheets. I am sharing some of my recent explorations using the latest version of Numbers version 5.01 in Mac High Sierra 10.13+ OS. To my knowledge there are no other specific … Continue reading Charting knits using Mac Numbers: color separations 2

Revisiting knit graph papers, charting, row tracking, and more

Work in progress DIY proportioned charts may be created using spreadsheet programs. I began to use Excel for charting in 2009, and continued to in nearly all the colored charts in my color separations for knits posts up to my latest computer upgrade. I now no longer have access to Office, and work primarily in … Continue reading Revisiting knit graph papers, charting, row tracking, and more

Lace edgings on Brother machines

The initial goal here is to produce a knit fabric using lace transfers in the familiar way, but the knit carriage will now be set to slip <–>, selecting needles with each pass. In routine lace patterning the KC is set for plain knit, does not preselect needles, advance the mylar, punchcard, or other electronic patterning. … Continue reading Lace edgings on Brother machines