From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

The chart here is simpler than those previously explored, appeared in a japanese publication, was suggested for use in MK as hand technique The lace transfers are in pairs, alternating in direction; this excel chart assigns symbols and colors to them. The repeat is 8 stitches wide, 10 rows tall, which make it suitable for … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

Continuing with the “relatives” of the proposed border chart in the previous post, this gets us even closet to the hand knit. So, I have a punchcard, a 12 stitch repeat, really want to go 14 wide for the repeat, and now several other issues are encountered. If  one thinks about lettering and controlling horizontal direction … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

In machine knitting, frequent color changes are more conveniently made with a color changer. On the Brother KM the latter is placed on the left side of the machine, so the knit carriage will be knitting by default an even number of rows moving from left to right and back to the left. In turn, … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

A forum post inquired on adapting the following border repeat for use on a punchcard Brother KM, using the lace carriage: the repeat is 14 stitches wide as was given below Because of repeat restriction in punchcard knitting, the best way to match the above chart is through the use of hand techniques. The image … Continue reading Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

I have posted previously on lace punchcards, their use, and traveling between machine models. There is extensive documentation in manuals and literature on the mechanics of their patterning. This series will attempt to follow my most recent post, and to visually address the transitions from a charted repeat to a corresponding punchcard. The illustrations may … Continue reading From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

A lace mesh series: GIMP, superimposing, Brother 910

I like placing motifs, grounds, and borders myself whenever possible, in any knitting technique, rather than relying on adding or combining them via the built in KM software.  It is simply my strong personal preference in designing and gives me additional controls over patterning. However, the ability to superimpose is a convenient feature, available on … Continue reading A lace mesh series: GIMP, superimposing, Brother 910

A lace mesh series: using GIMP

Eons ago I owned a BitKnitter for my Passap machine, and to this day I miss it and some of the other Cochenille software that is no longer available, especially when working with multiple colors for color separations of any sort. When using it for downloading the resulting motif, picking the same exact color for … Continue reading A lace mesh series: using GIMP

A lace mesh series WIP 1

This is a work in progress (WIP) post, subject to future additions and editing. These patterns are suitable for punchcard machines. Individual repeats in excel illustrations are outlined in red. They in turn are the minimal repeat information for electronic machines. The lace carriage always begins on left, transfers are made during either 2 or … Continue reading A lace mesh series WIP 1

“Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: tuck lace trims (and fabrics 1)

Any discussion of crochet like fabrics on home knitting machines, whether single or double bed, invariably lead to looking at gathered loops, whether created as a hand technique using holding, or automated by using the tuck setting. The function of the card remains the same when cam buttons are engaged, regardless of whether knitting single or … Continue reading “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: tuck lace trims (and fabrics 1)