“wisteria” cousin2 aka “fern leaf”, hand tech.

In seminar days this was referred to as  a”fern leaf” pattern. Holding groups in these sequences gives a bit more swing to the side of the finished piece. The difference between these fabrics and the ones that look like this swatch is that when the row of held sequences is completed from one side to … Continue reading “wisteria” cousin2 aka “fern leaf”, hand tech.

“wisteria” cousin revisited (“holding” using slip stitch)

My previous post on the related topic. I revisited the above fabrics in another experiment recently. This first sample was produced as a hand technique after casting on with 2 needles in work, 2 out of work. In the bottom half there were variations from 8 down to 4 rows of knitting before additional groups were … Continue reading “wisteria” cousin revisited (“holding” using slip stitch)

“Wisteria” 2

A follow up to the previous “horizontal cable” post: it has a relative that produces a flat or textured “lacey”  fabric depending on number of rows knit in each segment. an attempt at a graphic representation of the previous “wisteria/cable” The relative: after some initial rows of knitting (whether waste yarn or edge of actual … Continue reading “Wisteria” 2

“Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows

Another Ravelry thread recently looked at knitting this pattern, from an old Knittax pattern book I found this in a different manual, with similar structure, and “english” directions symbols used in Knittax patterns  On the purl side this creates structures that emulate crocheted shells. My first attempts at trying to knit anything like this were in thin yarn, … Continue reading “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows

Revisiting miters, spirals, going square, round, and more

I am working on updating my flickr photostream albums, including “all things holding” and will be revisiting posts on this topic over  the next few weeks, possibly adding edits. There are times in knitting when math becomes a necessity. With online libraries, tools, and fairly intuitive software, drafting angles and shapes is now much easier. I will be … Continue reading Revisiting miters, spirals, going square, round, and more

Horizontal “cable”

I live in the East Coast of the United States. In the 80s there used to be a yearly machine knitting seminar that was fairly well attended. There were droves of machine knitting publications. Susan Lazear, founder of Cochenille, was just beginning to develop her knit design software ideas on the Amiga Computers, and a … Continue reading Horizontal “cable”