Trying to coax a rectangle into a square.

Blocking is one of those topics open to endless debate both as to method and necessity. In most of the items I produce using conventional yarns, I restrict it pretty much to washing/pressing/ironing as needed, thus avoiding all those blocking wires, pins etc. In this instance however, the wire item is in need of some help in changing into and retaining the desired shape: my partial solution is seen in the photo above.

For the curious: Magnet wire or enamelled copper wire is a copper or aluminum wire covered with thin insulation. It is used in the construction of transformers,inductors, motors, headphones, loudspeakers, hard drive head positioners, potentiometers, and electromagnets, among other applications. However, it is not usually magnetic itself. Magnet wire insulating films used (in order of increasing temperature range) include polyurethane, polyamide, polyester, polyeseter-polyimide, polyamide-polyimide (or amide-imide), and polyimide. Kynar wire is an instance of color coated member of these families, and used in my “colored” jewelry items. For knitting on a loom I prefer 32 gauge or thinner (higher numbers), which can be plied successfully for more drape but are nearly invisible singly; 30 gauge or less(lower numbers) moves into the hand crochet/knit coil domain for me.

I enjoy using materials designed for uses other than those for which they were designed, the inherent challenge, surprises, and problem solving.

Playtime

While procrastinating returning to production knitting for the spring season I found myself inspired by Judy Perez’s Fiesta ornaments and have made my first attempts at metal embossing, adding them as elements in my postcard sized fabric collages, which in turn combine knits, needle felting, needlework techniques, and objects from a stash of accumulated “stuff’. Here are 2 of the results:

Continuing to explore

These are my first two attempts at needle felting on random swatches remaining from machine knit experiments. Both pieces measure “postcard” 4X6 inches. The scale restriction requires thinking in a new way for me, and provides a different way to play with my yarn stash and found objects. It is not clear if any of these techniques will be incorporated into my clothing and accessories, or simply be an end in themselves. Collage lace with some of the same fibers is also on my list of “must try”.

A Felt Tale

The price of changing yarn constantly: my hats are made of plied
multi strands of different color yarns as large forms, then felted.
The yellow reflects the “usual” style: purl side out yields the brimmed
version, knit side out converts to bucket style. The blue is a hat that
shrank unpredictably in width (the hats are sideways knit): a new
“style” is born, its embellishment is needle felted yarn.