Pintucks or ripple fabrics 1

Another ravelry question is bringing me to a new topic and thread. The information will be edited and added to as I have time and can gather corresponding swatches. Information, at least initially, will pertain to Brother brand machines.

The size of the pleat creating the ripple/  pintuck depends on the number of rows that can be knit on the all knit bed before the fabric begins to ride up and becomes difficult to retain on the needles in work. Tolerance depends on knitting machine brands as well as yarn used. Bold patterns read better than smaller ones. Weights are usually helpful. The term is commonly used in reference to fabrics created in every needle rib and their variants. The Brother Ribber techniques book (now available for free online) addresses the topic on pp. 20-23.

page20

page21

page 22

I have added a few patterns from published sources in a flickr album , most take into account any one stitch not being slipped for more than 4 rows. Doubling the length if using electronics is not recommended.

These fabrics may be created in combination with needles out of work. Charting out ribber needle set ups requires brick layout graph paper. The images below may serve to illustrate needle set ups. Print and add needle arrangements by hand, or use image processor to add symbols for needles both in and out of work on either bed. The first series begins and ends with needles on the ribber (Passap front bed), the one below it with needles on the main bed (Passap back bed).

ribber needle set up

ribber needle set up

 

Ruching 2: more working with stitch groups

Going straight up: color blocks in the chart below illustrate needle groups that get picked up and transferred onto the next colored row on the machine, not specific references to needle tape or any other markings. When repeating the operation in the same needle locations, having NOOW, thus creating ladders, makes it easier to keep track of groups. The yellow lines represent needles taken completely OOW at the start of knitting.  Any of these fabrics may be made in a single color, or varied color sequences. Sometimes changing the color in swatches, and using sharply contrasting ones in tests helps one understand the structure of the resulting fabric a bit more easily

an illustration of what part of the stitches to pick up

the result, knit side

its purl side

playing with spacings and rows, no ladders, knit side

purl side

playing with ladder spacing

its reverse

and using the FI setting in addition

its reverse

Some tips on ruched FI knitting: fabric will shrink considerably in length, so most motifs will need to be elongated to accommodate that. Having a pattern that may be tracked easily by watching the floats on its reverse is helpful as may working in bands where the colors swap spaces (changing yarn feeder positons). Because the fabric bubbles, knitting rows in only one color at intervals may track hook up row, while not visibly disrupting the pattern on its knit side. If small groups of stitches are to be picked up and rehung, markers with segments of nylon thread or yarn may be placed on the corresponding needles and be temporarily knit in. In addition the needle tape or needle bed may be marked with water soluble pen to indicate locations for rehanging. Depending on the pattern, number of stitches involved, and personal preference in terms of floats, needle selection in brother machines may have to be restored “by hand” to keep the design uninterrupted.

A few more: playing with striping and segment sizes

its reverse

in this red squares indicate row of additional ruching in center of solid striping

its reverse

going all one color in the middle

its reverse

all on one edge

its reverse

hooking up smaller numbers of stitches

its reverse

going part way, gathering one side, using thick and thin yarns

its reverse

as design bands

its reverse

going mini

its reverse

online samples by Kevin Quale

http://www.kevinquale.com/index.php?/knitting/swatches/

Ruching 1: fern “pretender”

Ruched or manual pull up effects can be created by rehanging stitches at regular intervals in a straight, diagonal, or random arrangement on plain knitting or patterned fabric. The pattern below could be considered a “fern pretender”, but is considerably quicker to knit. Again, for any textured fabric a yarn with “memory” is recommended for texture retention over time or after pressing, washing, etc.

Depending on how far over whether in this fabric, cables, etc, or how many stitches are moved on the needle bed, adjustments may have to be made either in tension or in the number of stitches moved. Adding striping and changing its sequences or combining different yarn weights may vary the look of the fabric considerably, and because it is a hand technique, motif repeats may be varied in size, scale, or location of hooked up stitches. The working charts represent the side facing one on the machine, so by default, all stitches are purl. Dark grey represents needles out of work, which will create ladders in the final fabric. All other squares are knit stitches. Green illustrates location of needles where the top purl bar of the stitch will be in turn picked up (in this case with a 2 prong tool), and where the tool will rehang those same stitches to create the desired texture. Red lines outline the repeats.

smaller repeat

the larger

The swatches are pictured below as they came off the machine, no pressing or steaming. The smaller repeat curls considerably, the larger lies much flatter. The longer ladder “floats” bear watching when rehanging the marked stitches to insure free gate pegs and stitches knitting off properly. I prefer to knit nearly all fabrics without any additional weight, using my fingers to pull down on what needs it as I move across the knit. The larger swatch required a tension change of + 2, in addition to the longer span of knit rows.

knit side

the purl side, with notable curling on the smaller repeat sample

In any fabrics requiring needles OOW, unless waste yarn and weights are a necessity, one may simply do a crochet cast on across the required number of needles, then drop off cast on stitches where NOOW are needed, pushing them back to A. In binding off using the latch tool chain bind off, treat empty needles as though they had stitches on them, and top and bottom edges will match in width.

Working with larger stitch groups and color changes:

The pattern stitch is in groups of 5;  knit 9, 10, or 11 rows (depending on yarn and tension). Beginning on the left hand side pick up 5 stitches from the first row, and hang them on the next group of 5 needles to their right on last row knit. Skip the next 5 stitches, pick up the next 5 with a transfer tool, and hang then on the next group of 5 needles to their right, repeating across the row. After the whole row is hooked up, repeat process, reversing the direction of hooking up. Starting side may be based on personal preference, consistency throughout is helpful. This pattern may be worked on an inset, resulting in ruffling on either side, or on a fixed edge as well, with ruffling on one side.

The groups of 5 colored squares indicate each set of stitches and needle placement, the arrows the direction and order in which the stitches are moved.

the swatch, knit side

purl side

same technique, used as a band rather than all over pattern

its reverse