Knit topological shapes

It is possible to construct topological shape via knitting. In HK this may be done on circulars. One out of many tutorials may be found here, and the mathematical knitting is a very good, extensive resource.

A recent forum post on knitting such shapes on the machine led me to dig out an old sample of mine knit with brass wire and holding on the km flatbed; since I never actually determined an end use, the donut hole inner seam was never joined.
in this view the piece is about 3 inches in height, and 8 inches across

a side view

Love in an uncertain world

A new/different direction from other neck pieces, my first with a “story” open to interpretation; it is composed of coiled, knit, crocheted, and stitched telephone and magnet copper wire, assorted beads, a couple of acupuncture needle covers, the cut/ partially frayed “heart” of an unfinished spirit doll, and a screw closure. It is also considerably more of a “burden” than the feather weight magnet wire cousins, weighs in at 3.5 oz./88 gms.

The latest in collar country

In anticipation of the fiber invitational in Lowell and the annual Art to Wear show at Cambridge Artists’ Cooperative, the copper wire is resurfacing in new neck pieces. Some of the presently completed work may be seen below. Materials often come with their own stories. I purchased my nearly invisible wires from an elderly gentleman at a RI yard sale years ago for only a few dollars. He in turn had worked using them on TV and radio tubes in the “old days”. The 32 gauge version was obtained with the assistance of a brother-in-law-electrician. A beaded piece is “in the works”, and then there is all that colored telephone wire and a shoebox full of acupuncture needle cases periodically calling out to me… I tend to work freeform, without sketching, piecing elements and working out designs and problems as I go. There are elements of surprise for me as well in each piece I create.

The beginning of a new/different direction

ladder lace and short rowed ruffles, modified commercial toggle closure

The finished collar tuck lace and ruffle collar; 4 strands of nearly invisible wire used throughout

Trying to coax a rectangle into a square.

Blocking is one of those topics open to endless debate both as to method and necessity. In most of the items I produce using conventional yarns, I restrict it pretty much to washing/pressing/ironing as needed, thus avoiding all those blocking wires, pins etc. In this instance however, the wire item is in need of some help in changing into and retaining the desired shape: my partial solution is seen in the photo above.

For the curious: Magnet wire or enamelled copper wire is a copper or aluminum wire covered with thin insulation. It is used in the construction of transformers,inductors, motors, headphones, loudspeakers, hard drive head positioners, potentiometers, and electromagnets, among other applications. However, it is not usually magnetic itself. Magnet wire insulating films used (in order of increasing temperature range) include polyurethane, polyamide, polyester, polyeseter-polyimide, polyamide-polyimide (or amide-imide), and polyimide. Kynar wire is an instance of color coated member of these families, and used in my “colored” jewelry items. For knitting on a loom I prefer 32 gauge or thinner (higher numbers), which can be plied successfully for more drape but are nearly invisible singly; 30 gauge or less(lower numbers) moves into the hand crochet/knit coil domain for me.

I enjoy using materials designed for uses other than those for which they were designed, the inherent challenge, surprises, and problem solving.