From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

The chart here is simpler than those previously explored, appeared in a Japanese publication, was suggested for use in MK as a hand technique The lace transfers are in pairs, alternating in direction; this excel chart assigns symbols and colors to them. The repeat is 8 stitches wide, 10 rows tall, which make it suitable … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 6, to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

Continuing with the “relatives” of the proposed border chart in the previous post, this gets us even closet to the hand-knit. So, I have a punchcard, a 12 stitch repeat, really want to go 14 wide for the repeat, and now several other issues are encountered. If one thinks about lettering and controlling horizontal direction … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 5 to electronic

From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

In machine knitting, frequent color changes are more conveniently made with a color changer. On the Brother KM the latter is placed on the left side of the machine, so the knit carriage will be knitting by default an even number of rows moving from left to right and back to the left. In turn, … Continue reading From lace chart to punchcard 3: adding stripes

Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

A forum post inquired on adapting the following border repeat for use on a punchcard Brother KM, using the lace carriage: the repeat is 14 stitches wide as was given below Because of repeat restriction in punchcard knitting, the best way to match the above chart is through the use of hand techniques. The image … Continue reading Frome lace chart to punchcard 4: a border tale

From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

I have posted previously on lace punchcards, their use, and traveling between machine models. There is extensive documentation in manuals and literature on the mechanics of their patterning. This series will attempt to follow my most recent post and to visually address the transitions from a charted repeat to a corresponding punchcard. The illustrations may … Continue reading From hand knit lace chart to punchcard 1

Numbers and GIMP: online punchcard patterns to electronics

There is a Russian website with a treasure trove of machine knitting patterns, some for 12 stitch models, and extensive collections for 24 stitch models including for fair isle, lace, and single motifs. There are pull-down options to show the full repeats charted for Silver Reed (default), Brother, and Toyota brands. The numbering system on … Continue reading Numbers and GIMP: online punchcard patterns to electronics

Lace meets FI on Brother machines

Very little has been written on this topic. The easiest method to produce the eyelet and fair isle combination is to create ladders in spaces between vertical FI motifs. The end needle selection is canceled. The swatches show the transitions in the development of the final design Susanna in her Machine Knitter’s Guide offers a … Continue reading Lace meets FI on Brother machines

Lace meets tuck on Brother Machines

Some DIY variations in combining both stitch types: Combining tuck stitches with lace 2 (automating them) 3/15 Combining tuck stitches with lace 1 3/15 Large diagonal eyelet lace, (a similar card and fabric, not tuck setting) 6/12 Large scale mesh, breaking rules 4/11 explains the use of punch card below Tuck stitch combination fabrics 5/19 … Continue reading Lace meets tuck on Brother Machines

Lace meets weaving on Brother Machines 2

Early Brother punchcard volumes showed symbol charts alongside punchcard repeats. The translations at times were not the best. Here is some of the advice offered for woven lace patterns:   This was one of the first such punchcard volumes published by Brother after the pushbutton earlier models were replaced by ones with card readers It has … Continue reading Lace meets weaving on Brother Machines 2