Unconventional uses for punchcards 2: thread lace cards for “filet” mesh

Mock filet crochet machine knit lace has surfaced in a Ravelry blog of late. The sample in question was made by Tanya Cunningham, using a hacked knitting machine and software to download the repeat. Sometimes punchcard machines or early electronic users feel left out of creating particular fabrics. If one can settle for working with … Continue reading Unconventional uses for punchcards 2: thread lace cards for “filet” mesh

A lace mesh series: GIMP, superimposing, Brother 910

I like placing motifs, grounds, and borders myself whenever possible, in any knitting technique, rather than relying on adding or combining them via the built-in KM software.  It is simply my strong personal preference in designing and gives me additional controls over patterning. However, the ability to superimpose is a convenient feature, available on multiple … Continue reading A lace mesh series: GIMP, superimposing, Brother 910

A lace mesh series: using GIMP

Eons ago I owned a BitKnitter for my Passap machine, and to this day I miss it and some of the other Cochenille software that is no longer available, especially when working with multiple colors for color separations of any sort. When using it for downloading the resulting motif, picking the same exact color for … Continue reading A lace mesh series: using GIMP

To mesh or not to mesh 5- design repeats

These patterns are suitable for punchcard machines. Individual repeats in excel illustrations are outlined in red. They in turn are the minimal repeat information for electronic machines. The lace carriage always begins on left, transfers are made during either 2 or 4 LC pass rows. In the first repeat below the LC operates for 4 … Continue reading To mesh or not to mesh 5- design repeats

To mesh or not to mesh 3

Many articles were written in the 1980s in Australia, New Zealand, and Britain, some finding their way to newsletters published in the USA at the time investigating this subject. With the advent of electronics the process became “easier”. Kathleen Kinder author of several books on Machine Knitting covering myriad topics (one whole text on lace), … Continue reading To mesh or not to mesh 3

To mesh or not to mesh 1

A good online grouping of mesh repeats is one place to start exploring this topic. Most proprietary large pattern books from machine knitting companies include at least a few suitable cards/mylar samples. They can be used for “all over” fabrics, borders, striping in mixed bands of varying styles, etc. I am presently interested in pursuing … Continue reading To mesh or not to mesh 1

The start of a blog index

WORK IN PROGRESS AYAB Revisiting Ayab_multiple colors per row DBJ 2 1/21 Drop stitch lace using Ayab software 2/ HOP  2/20 Revisiting Ayab_multiple colors per row DBJ  1/20 Ayab: short rows automated with slipstitch  5/18 Revisiting knitting with 2 carriages single bed, 910 vs Ayab so far  4/18 A Brother 910/ Ayab diary/ EMS kit … Continue reading The start of a blog index

Revisiting use of lace patterns Studio vs Brother machines

2011: There are several brand KMs still around and in use, most are no longer being manufactured. Questions often come up on how to use one KM brand pattern card on another. Card readers inside the machine are below eye level, so exterior number/other markings on cards or mylars reflect that, providing the knitter with … Continue reading Revisiting use of lace patterns Studio vs Brother machines

Thread Lace on Brother KM

Thread lace has also been called punch lace over the years. The “lace holes” are formed by knitting a fine thread with a significantly thicker yarn as the “second color”. When the fine yarn knits (B), a larger stitch in it alone is formed, with the thicker yarn floating behind it. The thicker yarn goes … Continue reading Thread Lace on Brother KM