“Wisteria” meets hems

I have previously posted on a series of fabrics related to this swatch, including suggestions for possibly automating some of their variations. The earliest blog post includes some of the histories for this fabric, is repeated here. In the 80s there used to be a yearly machine knitting seminar in my area that was fairly … Continue reading “Wisteria” meets hems

“wisteria” cousin2 aka “fern leaf”, hand tech.

In seminar days this was referred to as a “fern leaf” pattern. Holding groups in these sequences gives a bit more swing to the side of the finished piece. Directions for this fabric may be found in  the post  The difference between the fabrics below and the ones that look like this swatch is that when … Continue reading “wisteria” cousin2 aka “fern leaf”, hand tech.

“wisteria” cousin revisited (“holding” using slip stitch)

My previous post on the related topic. I revisited the above fabrics in another experiment recently. This first sample was produced as a hand technique after casting on with 2 needles in work, 2 out of work. In the bottom half, there were variations from 8 down to 4 rows of knitting before additional groups were … Continue reading “wisteria” cousin revisited (“holding” using slip stitch)

“Wisteria” 2

A follow-up to the previous post on the “horizontal cable“: it has a relative that produces a flat or textured “lacey”  fabric depending on the number of rows knit in each segment. This is an attempt at a graphic representation of the previous “wisteria/cable” The relative: after some initial rows of knitting (whether waste yarn … Continue reading “Wisteria” 2

“Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows

Some previous posts exploring hand techniques that might be considered to fall in this family of stitches: “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: tuck lace trims (and fabrics) 1 “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: tuck lace trims or fabrics 2 “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with “chains” Search for “wisteria” “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: … Continue reading “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows

The start of a blog index

WORK IN PROGRESS AYAB Revisiting Ayab_multiple colors per row DBJ 2 1/21 Drop stitch lace using Ayab software 2/ HOP  2/20 Revisiting Ayab_multiple colors per row DBJ  1/20 Ayab: short rows automated with slipstitch  5/18 Revisiting knitting with 2 carriages single bed, 910 vs Ayab so far  4/18 A Brother 910/ Ayab diary/ EMS kit … Continue reading The start of a blog index

A return to short row shapings: bumps and slits meet entrelac

My recent revisiting of holding techniques led to my coming across handouts and notes from the late 1980s and early 90s, including the working notes below for an entrelac fabric. I sometimes read instructions I assembled long ago, and they seem to be in a foreign language at first. Entrelac was referred to as basketweave … Continue reading A return to short row shapings: bumps and slits meet entrelac

A return to short row shapings: bumps and slits

One is limited to imagination, skill, and patience when working short rowed fabrics. The techniques may be used in borders, on isolated areas, symmetrically or not, and the yarn, in turn, may be able to be pressed, stiffened, felted (which minimizes any slits), or otherwise processed to achieve desired effects. The scale of the shapes … Continue reading A return to short row shapings: bumps and slits

Ayab: short rows automated with slipstitch

I have recently been reviewing some of my ideas for using slip stitch to achieve fabrics normally created by hand pulling needles for short rows. The samples for most charts below are found in previous posts on the topic. My hacked machine is presently being put to bed for a while as I work on … Continue reading Ayab: short rows automated with slipstitch

“Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows 1

Another Ravelry thread recently looked at knitting this pattern, from an old Knittax pattern book I found this in a different manual, with a similar structure, and “English” directions  Translation of symbols used in Knittax patterns On the purl side, this creates structures that emulate crocheted shells. My first attempts at trying to knit anything like this were in … Continue reading “Crochet” meets machine knitting techniques: working with short rows 1